audiology, Biometrics, hearables, Live-Language Translation, News Updates, Smart assistants, VoiceFirst

Hearing Aid Use Cases are Beginning to Grow

 

The Next Frontier

In my first post back in 2017, I wrote that the inspiration for creating this blog was to provide an ongoing account of what happens after we connect our ears to the internet (via our smartphones). What new applications and functionality might emerge when an audio device serves as an extension of one’s smartphone? What new hardware possibilities can be implemented in light of the fact that the audio device is now “connected?” This week, Starkey moved the ball forward with changing the narrative and design around what a hearing aid can be with the debut of its new Livio AI hearing aid.

Livio AI embodies the transition to a multi-purpose device, akin to our hearables, with new hardware in the form of embedded sensors not seen in hearing aids to date, and companion apps to allow for more user control and increased functionality. Much like Resound firing the first shot in the race to create connected hearing aids with the first “Made for iPhone” hearing aid, Starkey has fired the first shot in what I believe will be the next frontier, which is the race to create the most compelling multi-purpose hearing aid.

With the OTC changes fast approaching, I’m of the mind that one way hearing healthcare professionals will be able to differentiate in this new environment is by offering exceptional service and guidance around unlocking all the value possible from these multi-purpose hearing aids. This spans the whole patient experience, from the way the device is programmed and fit, to educating the patient around how to use the new features. Let’s take a look what one of the first forays into this arena looks like by breaking down the Livio AI hearing aid.

Livio AI’s Thrive App

Thrive is a companion app that can be downloaded to use with Livio AI, and I think it’s interesting for a number of reasons. For starters, what I find useful about this app is that it’s Starkey’s attempt to combat the potential link of cognitive decline and hearing loss in our aging population. It does this by “gamifying” two sets of metrics that roll into your 200 point “Thrive” score that’s meant to be achieved regularly.

Thrive Score.JPG

The first set of metrics is geared toward measuring your body activity, comprised around data collected through sensors to gauge your daily movement. By embedding a gyroscope and accelerometer into the hearing aid, Livio AI is able to track your movement, so that it can monitor some of the same type of metrics as an Apple Watch or Fitbit. Each day, your goal is to reach 100 “Body” points by moving, exercising and standing up throughout the day.Body

The next bucket of metrics being collected is entirely unique to this hearing aid and is based around the way in which you wear your hearing aids. This “brain” category measures the daily duration the user wears the hearing aid, the amount of time spent “engaging” other people (which is important for maintaining a healthy mind), and the various acoustic environments that the user experiences each day.

Brain Image.JPG

So, through gamification, the hearing aid wearer is encouraged to live a healthy lifestyle and use their hearing aids throughout the day in various acoustic settings, engaging in stimulating conversation. To me, this will serve as a really good tool for the audiologist to ensure that the patient is wearing the hearing aid to its fullest. Additionally, for those who are caring for an elderly loved one, this can be a very effective way to track how active your loved one’s lifestyle is and whether they’re actually wearing their hearing aids. That’s the real sweet spot here, as you can quickly pull up their Thrive score history to get a sense of what your aging loved one is doing.

Healthkit SDK Integration

 

Another very subtle thing about the Thrive app that has some serious future applications is that fact that Starkey has integrated Thrive’s data into Apple’s Healthkit SDK. This is one of the only third-party device integrations that I know of to be integrated into this SDK at this point. The image above is a side-by-side comparison of what Apple’s Health app looks like with and without Apple Watch integration. As you can see, the image on the right displays the biometric data that was recorded from my Watch and sent to my Health app. Livio AI’s data will be displayed in the same fashion.

So, what? Well, as I wrote about previously, the underlying reason this is a big deal, is that Apple has designed its Health app with future applications in mind. In essence, Apple appears to be aiming to make the data easily transferable, in an encrypted manner (HIPAA-friendly), across Apple-certified devices. So, it’s completely conceivable that you’d be able to share the biometric data being ported into your Health app (i.e. Livio AI data) and share it with a medical professional.

For an audiologist, this would mean that you’d be able to remotely view the data, which might help to understand why a patient is having a poor experience with their hearing aids (they’re not even wearing them). Down the line, if hearing aids like Livio were to have more sophisticated sensors embedded, such as a PPG sensor to monitor blood pressure, or a sensor that can monitor your body temperature (as the tympanic membrane radiates body heat), you’d be able to transfer a whole host of biometric data to your physician to help them assess what might be wrong with you if you’re feeling ill. As a hearing healthcare professional, there’s a possibility that in the near future, you will be dispensing a device that is not only invaluable to your patient but to their physician as well.

Increased Intelligence

Beyond the fitness and brain activity tracking, there are some other cool use cases that come packed with this hearing aid. There’s a language translation feature that includes 27 languages, which is done in real-time through the Thrive app and is powered through the cloud (so you’ll need to have internet access to use). This seems to draw from the Starkey-Bragi partnership which was formed a few years ago, which was a good indication that Starkey was looking to venture down the path of making a feature-rich hearing aid with multiple uses.

Another aspect of the smartphone that Livio AI leverages is the smartphone’s GPS. This allows the user to use their smartphone to locate their hearing aids if they have gone missing. Additionally, the user can set “memories” to adjust their hearing aid settings based on the acoustic environment they’re in. If there’s a local coffee shop or venue that the user frequents, where they’ll want their hearing aids to have a boost or turned down in some fashion, “memories” will automatically adjust the settings based on the pre-determined GPS location.

If you “pop the hood” of the device and take a look inside, you’ll see that the components comprising the hearing aid have been significantly upgraded too. Livio AI boasts triple the computing power and double the local memory capacity as the previous line of Starkey hearing aids. This should come as no surprise, as the most impressive innovation happening with ear-worn devices is what’s happening with the components inside the devices, due to the economies of scale and massive proliferation of smartphones. This increase in computing power and memory capacity is yet another example of the, “peace dividends of the smartphone war.” This type of computing power allows for a level of machine learning (similar to Widex’s Evoke) to adjust to different sound environments based on all the acoustic data that Starkey’s cloud is processing.

The Race is On

As I mentioned at the beginning of this post, Starkey has initiated a new phase of hearing aid technology and my hope is that it spurs the other four manufacturers to follow suit, in the same way that everyone followed Resound’s lead with bringing to market “connected” hearing aids. Starkey CTO, Achin Bohwmik, believes that traditional sensors and AI will do to the hearing aid what Apple did to the phone, and I don’t disagree.

As I pointed out in a previous post, the last ten years of computing was centered around porting the web to the apps in our smartphone. The next wave of computing appears to be a process of offloading and unbundling the “jobs” that our smartphone apps represent, to a combination of wearables and voice computing. I believe the ear will play a central role in this next wave of computing, largely due to the fact that it serves as a perfect position for an ear-worn computer with biometric sensors equipped that doubles as a home to our smart assistant(s) which will mediate our voice commands. This is the dawn of a brand new day and I can’t help but feel very optimistic about the future of this industry and hearing healthcare professionals who embrace these new offerings. In the end however, it’s the patient who will benefit the most and that’s a good thing when so many people could and should be treating their hearing loss.

-Thanks for Reading-

Dave

2 thoughts on “Hearing Aid Use Cases are Beginning to Grow”

  1. Great post, Dave! I did not know about the SDK integration but am glad that they pushed for it. I’m sure I’ll use your post as a reference in the future. Thanks for your effort in putting this together!!

    1. Thanks for reading, Madison! Yeah – the SDK integration is quietly a pretty big deal considering that Apple seems keen on facilitating medical info sharing between patient and doctor. In this future scenario, I honestly envision doctor’s saying to their patient, “you have chronic condition X, and I need you to send me your biometric data regularly,” and then providing the patient with a list of certified bio-feeders, which would include these type of hearing aids…so if that patient might feel inclined to wear a bio-feeder that doubles as a hearing aid…well, then, there’s a whole lot more people who are coming through the AuD’s doors.

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