Daily Updates, Future Ear Radio

Future Ear Daily Update: 4-18-19

The Future of Wearable Tech Is Called a Hearing Aid

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Image: PIPPA DRUMMOND FOR BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEK

Today, Bloomberg published a lengthy article on American hearing aid manufacturer, Starkey, and the way it has reinvented itself as a company following a rather nasty trial in 2016. The former leadership team was largely removed, either through convictions in the trial (lots of embezzling) or fired, and replaced by a number of industry outsiders. One of the most notable hires was Achin Bhowmik, formerly of Intel’s Perceptual Computing group, who came on board as the Chief Technology Officer.

Achin seems to be the brain behind Starkey’s new flagship hearing aid (which they’ve dubbed “healthable”) Livio AI, which in my opinion is the truest version of an “ear-computer” that we’ve seen to date. I’ve written a lot about Livio AI and won’t rehash here why I think this is such an important device not just to the hearing aid industry, but to the entire tech industry. Instead, what I want to write about today is an excerpt from the article near the end that is very revealing about true hearable adoption (emphasis mine):

“The next day, the audiologists go back to their practices to begin selling the Livio AI to patients. Which isn’t hard. Within just four months, the device will account for 50 percent of all product sales worldwide at Starkey. For 2019, the projection is 80 percent.

Since Starkey is a privately held company, we don’t see the type of public disclosures that reveal unit sales. So, to see that Livio AI is driving such a massive chunk of the company’s revenue is incredibly revealing. As bullish as I have been on hearables and the trend that we’ll all be adopting mini ear-computers across the next 5 years, I had absolutely no idea that Livio AI was thriving and penetrating the market as quickly as it is. This is evidence that the market is hungry and ready for sophisticated in-the-ear wearable devices.

The title of this article might seem odd and off-base, but as counter-intuitive as it seems, hearing aids really are on the bleeding edge of wearable innovation. We’re talking about a nearly invisible device, that offers 45-hours of battery life, a tandem of smart assistants that work in conjunction (Thrive Assistant for local queries; Ok Google for general, cloud-based queries), live-language translation in 27 languages, embedded inertial & heart rate sensors, and a companion app to support and visualize all these features and data. What other device on the market is capable of all that?

I understand that the price point is considerably high today, but in light of the sales volume of Livio AI, I would guess that the consumer market and fellow hearing aid manufacturers are going to follow the path that Achin and Starkey are blazing. My hope is that competition will lead to lower costs and make this type of technology accessible to the masses. With that being said, I would imagine that Starkey is going to continue to double-down on Livio AI and continue to transform in-the-ear devices into computers, the same way the iPhone transformed the phone into a pocket computer.

Who would have guessed that the humble hearing aid would one day be the poster child for body-worn technology and computing?

-Thanks for Reading-

Dave

To listen to the broadcast on your Alexa device, enable the skill here: https://www.amazon.com/Witlingo-Future-Ear-Radio/dp/B07PL9X5WK/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=future+ear+radio&qid=1552337687&s=digital-skills&sr=1-1-catcorr

To listen on your Google Assistant device, enable the skill here: https://assistant.google.com/services/a/uid/00000059c8644238

and then say, “Alexa/Ok Google, launch Future Ear Radio.”

Daily Updates, Future Ear Radio

Future Ear Daily Update: 4-17-19

The Significance of the Alexa HIPAA-Compliance News

Earlier this week, Teri Fisher published an episode of his Voice First Health podcast that was a compilation of eight different perspectives (plus Teri’s) on what the news surrounding Alexa becoming HIPAA-compliant meant to them. The folks that contributed their input to Teri’s Podcast were:

  1. Nate Treleor – President of Orbita
  2. Bianca Phillips – Founder of Electronic Health Consulting Group
  3. Yours Truly
  4. Heidi Culbertson – – Founder/CEO of Ask Marvee
  5. Dr. Neel Desai – Co-founder of MedFlash Go
  6. Stuart Patterson – CEO of Lifepod Solutions
  7. Timon LeDain – Director of Emerging Technologies at Macadamian Technologies
  8. Dave Isbitski – Chief Evangelist of Amazon Alexa
  9. Dr. Teri Fisher – Creator of the Alexa in Canada and Voice First Health podcasts and websites

Everyone had something unique and interesting to say. Some, like Nate Treleor, mentioned how significant this development was to their business (a secure platform for creating voice-enabled virtual assistants for the healthcare industry). While others, like Stuart Patterson, offered a different take, stating that it wasn’t as significant of a development as it would appear considering that the company Nuance has offered HIPAA-Compliant voice technology for years.

Some of my favorite comments from this podcast:

Heidi Culbertson: “I think this move by Amazon is one small step for voice, and one large step for making life better. I think its a huge opportunity for innovation and partnership among health organizations and third party development and design shops. Innovation happens and this is a really exciting time.”

Dr. Neel Desai: “This will help to cut down on all the telephone calls back and forth between the patients and the doctors. This is a great short cut that will improve communication and save time.”

Dr. Teri Fisher: “One of the things that I’m very excited about, even before the HIPAA announcement, is the idea that voice technology allows us to communicate with computers in the most natural way we know. I’m of the opinion that in the future we’re each going to have mini clinics in our home that are run by a voice-first device and its going to create a personalized, decentralized approach to healthcare. I believe this is the big next step in doing that.”

There’s clearly a lot of excitement around this development in the voice technology space and it’s going to be pretty fascinating to watch how this all unfolds at the intersection of healthcare and voice. This was an important first step in making this all become a reality and as the gates open to the developer and design communities, we’re sure to have a lot of new applications and use cases flourish.

-Thanks for Reading-

Dave

To listen to the broadcast on your Alexa device, enable the skill here: https://www.amazon.com/Witlingo-Future-Ear-Radio/dp/B07PL9X5WK/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=future+ear+radio&qid=1552337687&s=digital-skills&sr=1-1-catcorr

To listen on your Google Assistant device, enable the skill here: https://assistant.google.com/services/a/uid/00000059c8644238

and then say, “Alexa/Ok Google, launch Future Ear Radio.”

Daily Updates, Future Ear Radio

Future Ear Daily Update: 4-16-19

“I Didn’t Write this Column. I Spoke It.”

Image: Jim Wilson/ The New York Times

Last week, New York Times columnist, Farhad Manjoo wrote a piece titled, “I Didn’t Write this Column. I Spoke It.” It’s an interesting look at how Farhad writes his articles through a combination of using AirPods, the voice memos app RecUp, and then the transcription app Descript. He’s able to walk around the city and speak his columns into life, which he then uses as a draft to work off of when he transitions to the traditional means of a computer and keyboard to finalize and publish his pieces.

Here’s what Farhad had to say about his experience:

“Writing by speaking has quietly revolutionized how I work. It has made my writing more conversational and less precious. More amazingly, it has expanded my canvas: I can now write the way street photographers shoot — out in the world, whenever the muse strikes me (or more likely, when I’m loafing around, procrastinating on some other piece of writing). Most of my recent columns, including large portions of this one, were written this way: first by mouth, not fingers.”

As he points out in the piece, “there is something more interesting here than a newspaper columnist’s life hack.” He refers to this new phenomenon as the “screenless-internet” (which is more-or-less adjacent to the term voice-first, which I tend to use). The internet of tomorrow is shaping up to be much more ambient and multi-modal, meaning more device types (think every device being connected and part of the network), with voice at the center of it all as the core user-interface (UI).

Voice as a UI has been made viable in recent years thanks to advancements in natural language understanding (NLU), speech to text processing, a more connected & powerful cloud processor, and hardware that is designed for communicating with our machines via smart assistants (AirPods; smart speakers & smart displays). All of this equates to more intelligent smart assistants that don’t constantly ask you to repeat yourself (this still happens, but it’s decreasing in frequency).

Farhad’s experience is a great example of  the shift toward the internet of tomorrow. As he points out, it’s not as if the keyboard and computer method of writing his articles is no longer relevant, instead, this experience of using the “screenless-internet” augments his writing process. That’s the key point about moving into this new era of computing – it’s an additional layer and UI to begin leveraging so that you are less dependent on legacy interfaces if you so choose to be. The choice now exists and will continue to become more viable as the underlying technology powering our smart assistants and the voice UI continue to mature.

-Thanks for Reading-

Dave

To listen to the broadcast on your Alexa device, enable the skill here: https://www.amazon.com/Witlingo-Future-Ear-Radio/dp/B07PL9X5WK/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=future+ear+radio&qid=1552337687&s=digital-skills&sr=1-1-catcorr

To listen on your Google Assistant device, enable the skill here: https://assistant.google.com/services/a/uid/00000059c8644238

and then say, “Alexa/Ok Google, launch Future Ear Radio.”

Daily Updates, Future Ear Radio

Future Ear Daily Update: 4-15-19

Hearables Q1 Recap

This weekend, I published a quarterly recap of all the developments that occurred in the hearables space for the website Voicebot.ai. There was a lot of movement this past quarter, with new entrants entering or announcing that they’re entering the market soon, and old players raising the white flag. Meanwhile, Apple introduced an updated version of AirPods and the upcoming debut of Powerbeats Pro. Check out the article for a full-breakdown.

I would argue that up until this quarter, Apple’s AirPods have been pretty much left uncontested by its competitors, which has allowed Apple to get out to a comfortable lead in the true wireless earbud market. AirPods and Beats represent the best area for Siri to thrive. The era where Apple goes uncontested in the near-field appears to be ending as the other major smart assistant providers, Samsung and Amazon, enter into the ring (Google’s already in with Pixel Buds).

Amazon, to me, is the most serious contender to steal away market share from Apple in the near-field and the reason being is that Amazon can push its hardware effectively through its e-commerce arm. Along with the growth of Amazon smart speakers and the increasing adoption of Alexa, it would appear that Amazon.com receives millions of searches each month pertaining to headphones (thanks to Emily Binder for pointing this out):

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Once Amazon releases it’s upcoming “Alexa-buds” or whatever they’ll be named, guess which result Amazon is going to return to its users for all of these headphone-related searches? That’s the luxury Amazon affords as both the manufacturer and the retailer. While I mentioned in the article that one of the major challenges Amazon faces with its in-the-ear Alexa device is the lack of its own smartphone ecosystem, the fact that Amazon can rig its own shopping search engine should be a huge advantage and a reason to think Amazon’s AirPods competitor might be a serious challenge to AirPods initial dominance. Now, all of this is moot if Amazon’s hearable does not match or exceed AirPods’ quality, which is a significant challenge in itself.

The fact of the matter is that the voice assistant battleground has moved outside of the home into multiple new fronts. Auto, healthcare, education, enterprise, hospitality, banking and the near-field (the ear). Those are some of the new battlegrounds that Alexa, Siri, Bixby and Google are going to be competing in. Things are about to get really interesting.

-Thanks for Reading-

Dave

To listen to the broadcast on your Alexa device, enable the skill here: https://www.amazon.com/Witlingo-Future-Ear-Radio/dp/B07PL9X5WK/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=future+ear+radio&qid=1552337687&s=digital-skills&sr=1-1-catcorr

To listen on your Google Assistant device, enable the skill here: https://assistant.google.com/services/a/uid/00000059c8644238

and then say, “Alexa/Ok Google, launch Future Ear Radio.”

Daily Updates, Future Ear Radio

Future Ear Daily Update: 4-12-19

Speaking at VOICE Summit 2019

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I am super excited to announce that I will be presenting at the VOICE Summit 2019 that will be held in Newark, NJ from July 22-25. I’m going to be speaking on all the things I write about here daily – hearables, smart assistants, biometric monitoring, the explosion of audio content, etc. I’m really looking forward to combining all of the developments that are seeming to occur more and more rapidly, into a cohesive one-hour presentation. If you saw the talk I gave at the Alexa conference, this will be that talk, but with 7 months worth of more information and data. More chapters in this story that I’ve been telling, if you will.

This is going to be an absolutely awesome event and if you’re interested in joining, my biggest advice would be to just take the plunge and go. There will be more than 1,000 people from all different industries, ranging from small businesses to companies like Amazon, Microsoft, and Google. Reach out if you’d like to attend as I can provide you with a promo code for a discount.

I want to take a moment to thank everyone who has supported me across the past few years by reading, sharing and engaging with me and my content. The only reason I have gotten this far is because of the support I’ve had that has motivated me to keep pushing and writing. Thank you!

-Thanks for Reading-

Dave

To listen to the broadcast on your Alexa device, enable the skill here: https://www.amazon.com/Witlingo-Future-Ear-Radio/dp/B07PL9X5WK/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=future+ear+radio&qid=1552337687&s=digital-skills&sr=1-1-catcorr

To listen on your Google Assistant device, enable the skill here: https://assistant.google.com/services/a/uid/00000059c8644238

and then say, “Alexa/Ok Google, launch Future Ear Radio.”

Daily Updates, Future Ear Radio

Future Ear Daily Update 4-11-19

Netflix + Sirius XM

netflix is a joke sirius xm
Image: Techcrunch

Techcrunch reported yesterday a new partnership between Netflix and Sirius XM with a Netflix-branded Sirius XM comedy station (channel 93). The station will be titled, “Netflix is a Joke” and will convert stand-up comedy specials exclusive to Netflix to an audio format that will be aired throughout the day on Netflix’s Sirius XM channel. There will also be a daily comedy show where celebs and comedians will drop by to participate in the show, and other comedy specials derived from Netflix’s programming.

This is a really interesting move for a few reasons. First of all, as Techcrunch points out, this is the first time Netflix has partnered with another subscription service, and is likely doing so because Sirius XM is not perceived as a competitor by Netflix. This is a mutually beneficial partnership, as Netflix exposes the comedy arm of its offering to potential XM listeners not currently subscribed to Netflix who might be unaware of the breadth of comedy on Netflix. Sirius XM gains the inverse, especially considering that Netflix will be airing certain comedy specials on XM before it even airs the specials on Netflix itself, driving the most die-hard Netflix comedy fans toward XM.

Since I started the daily update a month ago, one of the most frequent topics of the daily postings have been around the explosion of audio content and the underlying reasons behind this boom. I think Daniel Ek, Spotify CEO, summed up best what’s going on in the “Audio First” letter he issued after Spotify acquired Gimlet Media and Anchor:

“To really understand, take the current value of the video industry. Consumers spend roughly the same amount of time on video as they do on audio. Video is about a trillion dollar market. And the music and radio industry is worth around a hundred billion dollars. I always come back to the same question: Are our eyes really worth 10 times more than our ears? I firmly believe this is not the case. For example, people still spend over two hours a day listening to radio — and we want to bring that radio listening to Spotify, where we can deepen engagement and create value in new ways. With the world focused on trying to reduce screen time, it opens up a massive audio opportunity.”

“Are our eyes really worth 10 times more than our ears?”

That’s the question that I think more and more content producers are asking themselves as they start to dip their toe in the audio-based content business. With the rapid adoption of hardware conducive to audio consumption, namely smart speakers & displays and true wireless earbuds (AirPods), it would seem that more and more companies are going the way of the ear with their content strategies to either augment or supplement their video strategies.

-Thanks for Reading-

Dave

Daily Updates, Future Ear Radio

Future Ear Daily Update: 4-10-19

Combating the Low Hearing Aid Penetration Rate

Along with FuturEar, another area of content that I produce regularly is educational videos targeted toward my industry (audiology) and the professionals within the industry (hearing healthcare professionals). Each week. I bring a guest on to record a 5-7 minute video to discuss their product, a subject matter they’re an expert on, or some type of initiative they’re involved in. For today’s update, I wanted to do a little bit of a crossover here on FuturEar to use the video I’ve published today to highlight a broader trend around hearing loss and accessibility to hearing loss solutions.

According to the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), “among adults aged 70 and older with hearing loss who could benefit from hearing aids, fewer than one in three (30 percent) has ever used them. Even fewer adults aged 20 to 69 (approximately 16 percent) who could benefit from wearing hearing aids have ever used them.” The U.S. hearing aid penetration rate sits at around 17% and isn’t rising, in some part due to the fact that our population continues to age and live longer. There are arguments as to why the penetration rate is as low as it is, from cost to vanity to accessibility, but regardless, it’s a major problem, especially when considering the comorbidities associated with untreated hearing loss.

There are a number of efforts currently underway to combat this issue.The first is the new the over-the-counter hearing aid law that was passed, signed by the President, and currently in the hands of the FTC, which is set to issue its guidelines and put this law into effect by 2020. This is an attempt to lower the cost of the devices and increase accessibility to hearing loss solutions. Though it remains to be seen how effective this law will be in increasing the adoption rate of hearing solutions, it should bring the cost of the devices down considerably.

The second effort is centered around new products, like the BeHear Now or Nuheara IQ Buds Boost, that are taking a new approach to what an assistive listening device looks like. With new form factors, increased “smart” functionality, and a price point that is three digits instead of four, this approach is geared toward combating both the cost and the stigma typically associated with hearing loss (I don’t want to feel/look old).

Many of these new products that double as headphones, while providing some amplification features, are interesting “gateways” to expose people to the extent of their loss and the way life sounds when their hearing is returned back to previous levels with the help of technology. The typical sales cycle of a hearing aid is considered to be around seven years long, and a big reason for that is because hearing loss is a progressive disease and you slowly lose your hearing over time. If people are exposed earlier in that cycle to how much their hearing has already deteriorated, then maybe they’ll go see an audiologist sooner and see if they should begin using hearing aids. Perhaps even a low-cost over-the-counter hearing aid.

It will be interesting to watch this space evolve as OTC takes effect next year and these new type of devices continue to surface and mature in what they can do. At the end of the day, my hope is that both help to attack the core issue that’s currently plaguing far too many people, and that’s the lack of a hearing loss solution that they can either afford, want to wear, and have reasonable access to.

-Thanks for Reading-

Dave

Daily Updates, Future Ear Radio

Future Ear Daily Update: 4-9-19

Snap + Podcasting

Image result for snap

Last Thursday, Snap held its first ever developer conference, “Partner Summit”  and announced a flurry of new ways that partners can integrate their offerings into Snapchat, or vice-versa. For example, you can add Snapchat photos or story videos to your Tinder profile. It shouldn’t really come as much of a surprise that Snap used Tinder as an example during this conference, considering that 75% of 13-34 year olds and 90% of 13-24 year olds in the U.S. use Snapchat.

Among all the announcements, the one that really caught my eye was from this tweet below:

I think this is pretty important for a few reasons. Spotify has been on a spending spree in 2019 and all of its acquisitions have been centered around podcasts. Gimlet Media and Parcast are both production studios that make podcast series, while Anchor is a service provider that makes it easy to produce & share podcasting and has a sophisticated ad tool. So, based on the tweet above, any podcast created within Spotify-owned Anchor will be easily shareable within the Snapchat app. Therefore, the first reason this is important is because it provides podcasters with another way to expose more people to their podcasts.

The second is that Snapchat as a medium allows for podcasters to engage with their fans through the app. Up until this point, I would argue that Instagram, Twitter, YouTube and Facebook have been much more likely avenues for podcasters to try and grow their audience. Snap, however, represents a new, unique channel built for driving loyalty and engagement through one-to-one or group video messaging and stories. Given the fun and unobtrusive nature of Snapchat, its “disappearing” content, and its core group of young power-users, I think that certain podcasts and podcast hosts will find a ton of value in sharing their content in the same medium they engage most meaningfully with their fans.

This is just another subtle example of the ecosystem being built out to support podcasting and audio content, and doing so by leveraging existing systems and platforms. As we move into an era where AirPods and all its competitors become more and more ubiquitous, the content and use cases appear headed to follow. If you build it, they will come.

-Thanks for Reading-

Dave

Daily Updates, Future Ear Radio

Future Ear Daily Update: 4-8-19

Voice XP’s Voice Experience Platform

VoiceXP - Voice Experience®

I recently caught up with Bob Stolzberg, CEO of Voice XP and fellow St. Louis native, to chat about the new platform Bob and his team have been working on the past few years. Voice XP is a full-service voice firm that works with companies all of sizes, ranging from small businesses to enterprise level businesses. Bob walked me through the soon-to-be-released Voice Experience Platform, and it’s evident to me that what they’ve built is going to be a big deal.

Any time the paradigm changes in computing, one of the most important aspects to the new paradigm’s maturation is the tool-set that enables the full spectrum of businesses to begin migrating portions of their digital presence to the new paradigm. The internet matured and became more useful as it became easier for businesses to build websites, expose people to their websites and offerings through search engines, and then share those findings with their networks as social media emerged. Mobile computing flourished as the app-economy boomed, and businesses were able to house their offerings through a variety of apps, while also being able to engage with their potential customers through more effective ad-targeting through companies like Facebook and Google.

Now that the paradigm is changing once again to a more ambient, decentralized internet with a voice-based user interface, the tool-sets to enable companies to adapt to this paradigm shift are as important as ever. The Voice Experience Platform allows for companies to create their very own Alexa skills and Google actions in a matter of minutes. This type of platform has the power to provide virtually any small business with an easy-to-use tool to create a voice experience. The platform guides you through the skill creation process, from the skill/action name and invocation phrase, to uploading audio, image and video files to be used within the skill for a multi-modal experience. The platform also provides a lead generation option if businesses want to send customers an SMS with coupons or notifications of various offers. In essence, the platform completely simplifies the process of creating a voice experience.

According to Voicebot.ai’s Smart Speaker Consumer Adoption report from March 2019, 66.4 million U.S. adults own a smart speaker, comprising 26.2 % of the US adult population. The audience, or the demand, is there for companies to begin interacting with via voice. Tools like the Voice Experience Platform should help out with the supply side. The importance of tools was essentially the backbone of the two-part (pt 1; pt 2) Voicebot article I wrote about the impending, “Cambrian Explosion of Audio Content.” The incentive for businesses to begin migrating their digital presence to a voice & audio experience, continues to grow as the user base swells. The tool-sets are emerging to better support the supply side, whether that be with creating podcasts, flash briefings, skills, actions, and all the other audio-based content and experiences that businesses can more easily generate, thanks to tools like Voice XP’s new platform.

-Thanks for Reading-

Dave

Daily Updates, Future Ear Radio

Future Ear Daily Update: 4-5-19

Amazon’s Hearables are Coming

Bloomberg reported yesterday that Amazon is in the midst of developing its first wearable – an ear-worn Alexa device. In other words, Amazon is about to go head-to-head with AirPods in the second half of this year when the company releases its Alexa earbuds. So, by the second half of this year, we’ll have four of the major smart assistant providers, Apple, Samsung, Google and Amazon, all competing for our ears with each’s own truly wireless headphones.

Make no doubt about it, while Amazon’s first wearable will initially start out as nothing more than wireless earbuds with some smarts and Alexa built-in, they will evolve into full-fledged ear-computers. The device is being developed inside of Amazon’s Lab126, it’s hardware division, which is full of ex-Doppler Labs engineers and employees. This was reported by Fast Company and then confirmed to me yesterday by KR Liu, former VP of Advocacy and Accessibility at Doppler. Doppler Labs, if you recall, was one of the first hearables manufacturers and a pioneer of shaping the idea of how an “ear-computer” should look, feel and function. Many of the brains behind the Doppler Here One are now working on Amazon’s device, as well as working at Google, Apple and Facebook. I would not be surprised at all to learn the same from many of the people who were working on Bragi’s hardware line too, which shut down this week.

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I’m in the process of writing a comprehensive recap of all the hearables news that came out in the first quarter of 2019 (there was a ton) for Voicebot.ai, so be on the lookout for that piece as I will be adding more commentary to Amazon’s Alexa-buds news in that article. Today, however, I want to shed a light on the fact that when this blog first started in the fall of 2017, the field was full of startups, like Bragi and Doppler Labs, and the recently introduced AirPods. Flash-forward to today and the field is filling up with all the tech giants, while Bragi and Doppler have fallen by the wayside.

On one hand, this bums me out as I hate to think these tech giants are so large that no hardware startup can compete (and to be clear, there are multiple hearable companies alive and well), but on the other, I’m encouraged by the fact that many of the visionaries who were pioneering the hearables space forward are now the brains behind the tech giants’ offerings. What’s becoming obvious is that while the past few years of the VoiceFirst focus was largely around the far-field – smart speaker and smart displays – 2019 and beyond is shaping up to be all about the near-field with our miniature ear-computers.  The ear is the hottest piece of real-estate in all of tech right now and due to the fierce competition for our ears, we should see a flood of innovation injected into the industry as each smart assistant provider competes to put its assistant right in our ears.

-Thanks for Reading-

Dave

To listen to the broadcast on your Alexa device, enable the skill here: https://www.amazon.com/Witlingo-Future-Ear-Radio/dp/B07PL9X5WK/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=future+ear+radio&qid=1552337687&s=digital-skills&sr=1-1-catcorr

To listen on your Google Assistant device, enable the skill here: https://assistant.google.com/services/a/uid/00000059c8644238

and then say, “Alexa/Ok Google, launch Future Ear Radio.”